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"Preserving the memories so others will remember"™

Suggested Reading – MAY 2015 Part 01

A NEW FEATURE – Suggested Reading

In an effort to provide some quality reading for the audience out there,  there will be going forward a regular suggested reading for further enrichment beyond the content on these pages…  the first installment focuses on fitness.

 

It’ s not too late to get ready for summer here in the Northern Hemisphere.  I discovered a great e-book that will help you get on track.  The author is well versed in the area of fitness.

TITLE – HOW TO GET FIT FAST

 

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Posted 4 months ago at 8:00 pm.

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National Museum of the Marine Corps Expansion – Part 1

HERE THEY GROW AGAIN …

One of my favorite museums since 2006 has been the National Museum of the Marine Corps located just outside the Marine Corps Base at Quantico, Virginia.  It’s a short ride down the interstate from the Washington DC area and the spire of the museum building is always beckoning to visit (you’ll be glad you did!)

On Friday 27 MAR 2015 despite the rainy weather, a celebratory ceremony took place both in and outside the spacious atrium marking the new expansion of the museum that will double the exhibit space – adding 120,000 square feet – and more.  The new Timothy T. Day Overlook was also dedicated.  Among the special guests and speaker on hand was the 35th Commandant of the US Marine Corps retired General  James F. Amos USMC (Ret.)

 

Presiding over the official groundbreaking of the expansion of the National Museum of the Marine Corps, (left to right) Lin Ezell, Director, National Museum of the Marine Corps; Gen. Walter E. Boomer, USMC (Ret), Chairman of the Board, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation; Timothy T. Day, Founder, Bar-S Foods, Inc.; Sandy R. Day, Director, Timothy T. Day Foundation; Lt. Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC, Deputy Commandant for Programs & Resources; Lt. Gen. Robert R. Blackman, Jr., USMC (Ret), President and CEO, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation; Gen. James F. Amos, USMC (Ret), 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps; Lt. Gen. Ron Christmas, USMC (Ret), former President and CEO, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation

Presiding over the official groundbreaking of the expansion of the National Museum of the Marine Corps, (left to right) Lin Ezell, Director, National Museum of the Marine Corps; Gen. Walter E. Boomer, USMC (Ret), Chairman of the Board, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation; Timothy T. Day, Founder, Bar-S Foods, Inc.; Sandy R. Day, Director, Timothy T. Day Foundation; Lt. Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC, Deputy Commandant for Programs & Resources; Lt. Gen. Robert R. Blackman, Jr., USMC (Ret), President and CEO, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation; Gen. James F. Amos, USMC (Ret), 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps; Lt. Gen. Ron Christmas, USMC (Ret), former President and CEO, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation

Dumfries, Va. (March 27, 2015) – The first visitors of the day were beginning to file into the National Museum of the Marine Corps outside Quantico, Va. this morning, when an excavator sitting on the steep hill rising against the north wall of the museum rumbled to life and drove its bucket into the earth, officially breaking ground on a historic expansion of the nation’s home for Marine Corps history. The operator behind the controls of the excavator was himself a Marine who served during the 40 years since the end of the Vietnam War that are not yet represented in the museum’s galleries. Upon completion of the construction, the museum will have doubled in size to make room for a giant screen movie theater, expanded education suite, a Marine Sports Hall of Fame, Marine Corps Combat Art Gallery, and two additional galleries depicting the bravery and service of the men and women who served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1976 though present day.

The award-winning museum, which opened in 2006 and completed its first additions in 2010, currently includes permanent galleries representing Marine Corps history from the Corps’ establishment in 1775, through the end of the Vietnam War. Construction of the 120,000 square feet of new physical space is expected to be finished in 2017. The first of the new artifacts will be installed beginning in 2016, and all new galleries and exhibits will be complete by 2020.

“The National Museum of the Marine Corps is a world-class institution that has been enjoyed by more than four million visitors from around the world. Yet, it remains incomplete until it tells the story of every man and woman who has earned the title, ‘Marine,” said Lt. Gen. Robert R. Blackman, Jr., president and CEO of the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation. “Marines, corporations, foundations and individual Americans have made this magnificent museum possible. And I have no doubt that we will see their continued support as we construct spaces to honor today’s generation of Marines.”

Nearly 200 guests attended the groundbreaking ceremony, including one Marine Corps veteran who helped make the expansion possible as the foundation’s largest individual donor. Timothy T. Day, founder of Bar-S Foods, donated more than $12 million toward construction of the new spaces. A portion of his gift also sponsored the Timothy T. Day Overlook in Semper Fidelis Memorial Park, adjacent to the museum. The overlook was dedicated shortly after the groundbreaking ceremony, and will offer visitors a scenic vista along the park’s memorial lined paths.

A committee of senior advisors, including general officers and senior enlisted Marines, and a long list of subject matter experts representing veteran service organizations, education groups, Marine Corps family focus groups, and the Marine Corps’ Wounded Warrior Regiment, guided the planning of the expansion’s design and contents. The first artifacts to be added will be among the most dramatic. A World War II SBD Dauntless dive bomber will be hung from the museum’s soaring glass ceiling above the existing Tarawa display. A tableau featuring a Vietnam-era Sikorsky UH-340D helicopter will also be added.  In 2017, a two-story, giant-screen theater with a 350-seat capacity will open and feature a spectacular film about the celebrated history of the Marine Corps with a focus on the modern day Marine.

The following year, a gallery depicting Marine Corps service in regional conflicts and in humanitarian relief missions after the Vietnam War, including those in Beirut, Grenada and the Persian Gulf, will open to visitors. The Global War on Terror gallery will open at the same time, telling the latest chapter of Marine Corps history following the attacks of September 11, 2001. These two galleries will feature an impressive collection of large artifacts, including an AAV7A1 amphibious vehicle, M198 howitzer, an M60A1 tank, MAT-V mine-resistant vehicle and Bell UH-1N Huey helicopter. Some of the smaller, yet powerfully symbolic artifacts will include an oil-soaked Marine Corp flag from Desert Storm, election ballots from Iraq, gear worn by Women Marines whose critical role during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom marked historic firsts for the Marine Corps, and the rifle carried by Navy Cross recipient Sgt. Rafael Peralta.

“Today’s Marines have made the same indelible mark on the history of our Marine Corps, nation and world as every Marine who has served since 1775,” said Lt. Gen. Blackman. “They have earned their place in this extraordinary museum, and the ground we broke today is a symbol of our commitment – our mission will not be accomplished until this museum is complete.”

Marine Corps Heritage Foundation

About the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation:

Dedicated to the preservation and promulgation of Marine Corps history, the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation was established in 1979 as a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. The Foundation supports the historical programs of the Marine Corps in ways not possible through government funds. The Foundation provides grants and scholarships for research and the renovation, restoration, and commissioning of historical Marine Corps artifacts and landmarks. Securing the necessary funding for the complete construction of the National Museum of the Marine Corps and Heritage Center, located in Triangle, Virginia, is the Foundation’s current primary mission while continuing to provide program support for the Corps’ historical, museum, and educational activities. For more information, visit MarineHeritage.org.

TO BE CONTINUED …

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Posted 5 months, 1 week ago at 6:29 pm.

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Smithsonian Castle in Flames – 24 JAN 1865

Smithsonian Castle in Flames

Smithsonian Castle in Flames

It was one hundred and fifty years ago that the Smithsonian castle was in flames due to a fire that began as a result of a faulty installation of a flue.

 

The Smithsonian has offered a comprehensive account of the fire and the Mary Henry the daughter of  Joseph Henry, (who was the first Secretary of the Smithsonian) provided a recollection in her diary the following day.

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Posted 7 months, 1 week ago at 6:04 am.

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Improvement

James Allen

James Allen

 Men are anxious to improve their circumstances, but are  unwilling to improve themselves; they therefore remain  bound.
– James Allen

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Posted 1 year ago at 11:29 pm.

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LOVE

Czeslaw Milosz Polish Poet  Nobel Prize

Czeslaw Milosz
Polish Poet
Nobel Prize

“Love means to look at yourself
The way one looks at distant things
For you are only one thing among many.”
– Czeslaw Milosz

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Posted 1 year ago at 10:59 pm.

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What’s A Military Good For Anyway?

COL Harry G Summers

COL Harry G Summers

 

 

“We need to maintain an adequate military force in peacetime for deterrence, assurance and war fighting”

Colonel Harry Summers USA Ret.

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Posted 1 year, 1 month ago at 6:58 am.

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US Senate Honors LTG Lesley J. McNair

 

For those of you who don’t know,  Washington DC has a US Army Post honoring LTG Lesley J. Mcnair who was killed on the front lines in France.

LTG Lesley J. McNair USA

LTG Lesley J. McNair USA

On July 25, 1994, the United States Senate honored LTG Lesley J. McNair in the chambers of the Senate in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of his death. The following is a transcript of the Senate proceedings.

Continue Reading…

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Posted 1 year, 1 month ago at 9:56 pm.

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Friendships

Abraham Lincoln and his son Tad

Abraham Lincoln and his son Tad

“The better part of one’s life consists of his friendships.”

– Abraham Lincoln

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Posted 1 year, 1 month ago at 6:28 am.

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TRUTH

Emile Zola

Emile Zola

 

 

 

“If you shut up truth and bury it under the ground, it will but grow, and gather to itself such explosive power that the day it bursts through it will blow up everything in its way.”

― Émile Zola

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Posted 1 year, 2 months ago at 9:05 pm.

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Stanton Declares 200 Acres Arlington National Cemetery

A National Cemetery is Declared

On 15 JUNE 1864 Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton designated 200 acres of the Custis-Lee estate as a national cemetery. The 1,100 acres were owned by Mary Custis who married Robert E. Lee.  And on this day a portion of the estate welcomed those who have served in the United States military.  The rolling hills would soon be the final resting place for the many who were fighting in the United States Civil War.  Who knew what the future would hold for these acres.

The first burials began just a month earlier when PVT William Christman was laid to rest on May 13th. His final resting place is now in Section 27 of Arlington National Cemetery. The location is quite far from where Quartermaster General Montgomery Meigs initially wanted the burials to occur – right around Mary Custis’ rose garden, just south of the mansion.  On June 15, 1864 Meigs officially gave the orders to continue his mission to bury the dead near the mansion.  Though the burials would continue among the newly designated acres.  James Parks dug the first graves for these burials to occur.

The First Tomb of the Unknowns

Civil War Tomb of the Unknowns

Civil War
Tomb of the Unknowns

It was dedicated in September 1866 and sits between the rose garden of Mary Custis Lee and the original amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery.   The Tomb to the Civil War Unknowns was constructed by the US Army Corps of Engineers at the direction of  General Meigs.  A pit was dug that was about 20 feet deep and 20 feet around.  The walls and bottom were brick-lined and compartments were made with mortared brick walls.  Each compartment was to hold different body parts.   Unknowns were collected from the battlefield of Bull Run and route along the way as the troops retreated to the Rappahannock.  The remains of 2,111 Union and Confederate dead were collected and enclosed inside before it was sealed with concrete and dirt.  Meigs designed a centagraph to sit on top of the tomb.    On one side of the tomb are inscribed the words below:

BENEATH THIS STONE
REPOSE THE BONES OF TWO THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVEN UNKNOWN SOLDIERS
GATHERED AFTER THE WAR
FROM THE FIELDS OF BULL RUN, AND THE ROUTE TO THE RAPPAHANNOCK,
THEIR REMAINS COULD NOT BE IDENTIFIED. BUT THEIR NAMES AND DEATHS ARE
RECORDED IN THE ARCHIVES OF THEIR COUNTRY, AND ITS GRATEFUL CITIZENS
HONOR THEM AS OF THEIR NOBLE ARMY OF MARTYRS. MAY THEY REST IN PEACE.
SEPTEMBER. A. D. 1866.

 

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Posted 1 year, 2 months ago at 11:15 pm.

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