ss_blog_claim=88ca3880687b7b819c2e35360c96f4c5

Photography by John Michael

"Preserving the memories so others will remember"™

What’s A Military Good For Anyway?

Col Harry Summers Whats A Military Good For Anyway?

COL Harry G Summers

 

 

“We need to maintain an adequate military force in peacetime for deterrence, assurance and war fighting”

Colonel Harry Summers USA Ret.

share save 120 16 Whats A Military Good For Anyway?

Posted 23 hours, 19 minutes ago at 6:58 am.

Add a comment

US Senate Honors LTG Lesley J. McNair

 

For those of you who don’t know,  Washington DC has a US Army Post honoring LTG Lesley J. Mcnair who was killed on the front lines in France.

time mcnair 227x300 US Senate Honors LTG Lesley J. McNair

LTG Lesley J. McNair USA

On July 25, 1994, the United States Senate honored LTG Lesley J. McNair in the chambers of the Senate in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of his death. The following is a transcript of the Senate proceedings.

Continue Reading…

share save 120 16 US Senate Honors LTG Lesley J. McNair

Posted 2 days, 8 hours ago at 9:56 pm.

Add a comment

TRUTH

Emile Zola TRUTH

Emile Zola

 

 

 

“If you shut up truth and bury it under the ground, it will but grow, and gather to itself such explosive power that the day it bursts through it will blow up everything in its way.”

― Émile Zola

share save 120 16 TRUTH

Posted 1 month, 1 week ago at 9:05 pm.

Add a comment

Stanton Declares 200 Acres Arlington National Cemetery

A National Cemetery is Declared

On 15 JUNE 1864 Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton designated 200 acres of the Custis-Lee estate as a national cemetery. The 1,100 acres were owned by Mary Custis who married Robert E. Lee.  And on this day a portion of the estate welcomed those who have served in the United States military.  The rolling hills would soon be the final resting place for the many who were fighting in the United States Civil War.  Who knew what the future would hold for these acres.

The first burials began just a month earlier when PVT William Christman was laid to rest on May 13th. His final resting place is now in Section 27 of Arlington National Cemetery. The location is quite far from where Quartermaster General Montgomery Meigs initially wanted the burials to occur – right around Mary Custis’ rose garden, just south of the mansion.  On June 15, 1864 Meigs officially gave the orders to continue his mission to bury the dead near the mansion.  Though the burials would continue among the newly designated acres.  James Parks dug the first graves for these burials to occur.

The First Tomb of the Unknowns

civil war tomb of unknowns Stanton Declares 200 Acres Arlington National Cemetery

Civil War
Tomb of the Unknowns

It was dedicated in September 1866 and sits between the rose garden of Mary Custis Lee and the original amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery.   The Tomb to the Civil War Unknowns was constructed by the US Army Corps of Engineers at the direction of  General Meigs.  A pit was dug that was about 20 feet deep and 20 feet around.  The walls and bottom were brick-lined and compartments were made with mortared brick walls.  Each compartment was to hold different body parts.   Unknowns were collected from the battlefield of Bull Run and route along the way as the troops retreated to the Rappahannock.  The remains of 2,111 Union and Confederate dead were collected and enclosed inside before it was sealed with concrete and dirt.  Meigs designed a centagraph to sit on top of the tomb.    On one side of the tomb are inscribed the words below:

BENEATH THIS STONE
REPOSE THE BONES OF TWO THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVEN UNKNOWN SOLDIERS
GATHERED AFTER THE WAR
FROM THE FIELDS OF BULL RUN, AND THE ROUTE TO THE RAPPAHANNOCK,
THEIR REMAINS COULD NOT BE IDENTIFIED. BUT THEIR NAMES AND DEATHS ARE
RECORDED IN THE ARCHIVES OF THEIR COUNTRY, AND ITS GRATEFUL CITIZENS
HONOR THEM AS OF THEIR NOBLE ARMY OF MARTYRS. MAY THEY REST IN PEACE.
SEPTEMBER. A. D. 1866.

 

share save 120 16 Stanton Declares 200 Acres Arlington National Cemetery

Posted 1 month, 1 week ago at 11:15 pm.

Add a comment

The Value of Monuments

A monument is an expressive symbol. A good one, looked at for even a few minutes will remain in memory for years or even for one’s entire lifetime. Monuments are the milestones in a nation’s history — they will not allow other systems and governments to destroy the core values of a national culture.

—Andrzej Pitynski

Continue Reading…

share save 120 16 The Value of Monuments

Posted 1 month, 3 weeks ago at 5:44 am.

Add a comment

Arlington National Cemetery’s Confederate Memorial Centennial

anc confederate memorial Arlington National Cemeterys Confederate Memorial Centennial

Confederate Memorial
at
Arlington National Cemetery

The Confederate Memorial within Arlington National Cemetery turned 100 on June 4, 2014.

Continue Reading…

share save 120 16 Arlington National Cemeterys Confederate Memorial Centennial

Posted 1 month, 3 weeks ago at 12:48 am.

Add a comment

Lincoln Lincoln I’ve Been Thinking

Lincoln Memorial 01 Lincoln Lincoln Ive Been Thinking

Dedication of
Lincoln Memorial
on 30 MAY 1922

It’s MAY 30th.  It’s the Traditional Memorial Day – once known as “Decoration Day” as declared by MG John A. Logan in 1868

The Lincoln Memorial is visited each year by over 4 million people. Its grand location on the western end of the National Mall is a fitting  place for this memorial to the 16th President of the United States of America.

The memorial was proposed several times and likewise the location. Construction began on the Lincoln Memorial on February 12, 1914 after many obstacles.   President William Howard Taft had been named president of the Lincoln Memorial Commission

Lincoln Memorial 02 Lincoln Lincoln Ive Been Thinking

President Warren Harding
Speaking at the
Lincoln Memorial

in 1910.

The completion of the memorial construction took until 1922….

 

 

MAY 30, 1922 – It was on this day that the dedication of this well deserved memorial occurred

Lincoln Memorial 03 Lincoln Lincoln Ive Been Thinking

Chief Justice William H Taft
presents Lincoln Memorial
to
President Warren Harding

and then Chief Justice William Howard Taft presented President Warren Harding the newly completed memorial.

share save 120 16 Lincoln Lincoln Ive Been Thinking

Posted 1 month, 4 weeks ago at 9:04 am.

Add a comment

Remembering Those Who Never Came Home to the USA

It’s 2014.  As we approach the 70th anniversary of D-Day – one of the most bloodiest days in World War II, few are aware that many who served in World War I, World War II and other wars never returned to the United States of America – USA.   They are either at rest in 25 Cemeteries, most of which are on foreign soil – France, Belgium, United Kingdom, Philippines,Luxembourg, Mexico, Italy, Panama, Tunisia and Netherlands or memorialized within the monuments in the cemeteries.   Under the care of a little known independent agency of the United States of America known as the American Battle Monuments Commission, those at rest are well cared for.

Among them who never made it home to the USA are Theodore Roosevelt, Jr – son of the President and General George S. Patton, Jr.

It began in 1923 after World War I and it is responsible for Permanent American Military Burial Grounds in Foreign Countries of those who have never returned to the USA.   Here is a better description of what the American Battle Monuments Commission does from the words on it’s website:

ABMC administers, operates, and maintains 25 permanent American burial grounds on foreign soil. Presently there are 124,908 U.S. war dead interred at these cemeteries to include 30,922 of World War I, 93,236 of World War II and 750 of the Mexican War. Additionally 14,907 American veterans and others are interred in the Mexico City National Cemetery, Corozal American Cemetery and Clark Veterans Cemetery. Another 94,000 names of the missing are memorialized at the World War I and II cemeteries overseas and at the East Coast, West Coast and Honolulu Memorials in the United States: 4,452 names from World War I; 78,979 names from World War II; 8,200 names from the Korean War, and 2,504  names from the Vietnam War.

ABMC also maintains 26 memorials, monuments and markers worldwide. Three memorials in Washington, D.C. – the American Expeditionary Forces Memorial, the Korean War Memorial and the World War II Memorial – were established by ABMC and are now administered by the National Park Service.

What follows below is a slideshow of 24 of the cemeteries and below that is a list of the cemeteries with country and which war.

Battle Monuments Slide Show

Cemetery Country Conflict
Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial France World War I
Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium World War II
Brittany American Cemetery and Memorial France World War II
Brookwood American Cemetery and Memorial United Kingdom World War I
Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial United Kingdom World War II
Corozal American Cemetery and Memorial Panama Panama Canal
Epinal American Cemetery and Memorial France World War II
Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium World War I
Florence American Cemetery and Memorial Italy World War II
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium World War II
Lorraine American Cemetery and Memorial France World War II
Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial Luxembourg World War II
Manila American Cemetery and Memorial Philippines World War II
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial France World War I
Mexico City National Cemetery Mexico Mexican War
Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial Netherlands World War II
Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial France World War II
North Africa American Cemetery and Memorial Tunisia World War II
Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial France World War I
Rhone American Cemetery and Memorial France World War II
Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial Italy World War II
Somme American Cemetery and Memorial France World War I
St. Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial France World War I
Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial France World War I

 

share save 120 16 Remembering Those Who Never Came Home to the USA

Posted 2 months ago at 7:00 am.

Add a comment

Flags In – A tradition at Arlington National Cemetery

Flags in 0 Flags In   A tradition at Arlington National Cemetery

Old Guard Soldier – Flags In

2014 Memorial Day Weekend is ahead of us.  The work has already begun at Arlington National Cemetery. Soldiers from The Old Guard – 3d Infantry Regiment of the US Army are ready. They are equipped with their rucksacks filled with American flags and will spend the next few hours placing a flag in front of every headstone in the cemetery.  With 624 acres, over 250,000 flags will soon be fluttering in the gentle breeze across the rolling hills of this national shrine.   A tribute of thanks to those who have served and are at rest among the acres. Continue Reading…

share save 120 16 Flags In   A tradition at Arlington National Cemetery

Posted 2 months ago at 2:53 pm.

2 comments

Arlington National Cemetery: The Beginnings

montgomery meigs Arlington National Cemetery: The Beginnings

BG Montgomery C. Meigs

 

It was May 1864. The United States Civil War was entering the fourth year of the North fighting the South.  Casualties were high,
hospitals were overcrowded and the cemeteries surrounding Washington DC were filling up quickly.

Brigadier General Montgomery Meigs was the Quartermaster General of the Union forces. In this position, he was in charged of equipping all Union forces for every need, except ordnance.  While in this position, his accomplishments impacted the City of  Washington DC in many ways.

It is said that  it was his payback to Robert E. Lee that resulted in Arlington National Cemetery.  For as the DC cemeteries were full, Meigs ordered that the land surrounding Arlington House on the Custis-Lee estate the home of Mary Custis and Robert E. Lee be used as gravesites.

Apparently, the orders were not completely understood and what happened was much different than what General Meigs expected.

Continue Reading…

share save 120 16 Arlington National Cemetery: The Beginnings

Posted 2 months, 2 weeks ago at 5:55 am.

1 comment